Latest Reviews of ‘A Thousand Suns’

Here are three more reviews:

1. http://www.tlynnadams.com/p/reviews-and-interviews.html

2. http://www.bendingthespine.blogspot.ch/2013/04/blog-tour-review-thousand-suns-by-jim.html

3. http://stephanieworlton.blogspot.com/2013/03/a-thousand-suns-by-jim-haberkorn.html

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Where did the title ‘A Thousand Suns’ come from?

     The other night a friend asked me how I came up with the title A Thousand Suns.  Here’s the background: The title is not taken from the Linkin Park album ‘A Thousand Suns.’ And it’s not from the Iron Maiden song ‘Brighter than a Thousand Suns.’ Both of those musical creations got the phrase from a statement by Robert Oppenheimer, the leader of the Manhattan project, who, after seeing the first atom bomb go off at Alamogordo, New Mexico on July 15, 1945, said that it reminded him of these words from the Bhagavad-Gita: “If the radiance of a thousand suns were to burst at once into the sky that would be like the splendor of the Mighty one…”

And then a minute later when he saw the mushroom cloud rise high above the earth, he said it made him think of the rest of that poem: “Now I am become Death, the destroyer of Worlds.”

But this is how it came to be in my book. Just as they were ready to fall asleep, Yohaba asked Rulon how much did his enemies hate him. This is the rest of the scene: 

Half asleep, without opening his eyes, Rulon mumbled, “Oh…I’d say with the heat of a thousand suns. Yeah, that sounds about right…”

After a few minutes, Yohaba propped herself up on one elbow and looked at Rulon sleeping like a baby. Moonlight breaking through the clouds streamed in the window and made moving shadows on Rulon’s face. Her love for him stirred and her heart gave a leap. She looked around the room and up at the ceiling trying to focus on something, anything, to keep from crying. She managed all right except for a single tear that ran down her face into the corner of her mouth.

The salty tear mixed with the lingering feel of Rulon’s lips acted like an Oracle’s potion. It set her mind to racing and conjuring up memories of their life together, the love and violence they had shared so far in equal doses, as if a cosmic scale needed to stay in balance. Yohaba gasped, suddenly overwhelmed with a portent of the future – this will not end well. She knew it without a doubt: There will be blood.

The moment of realization quickly passed and was replaced with a terrible calm. Looking down at Rulon’s kindly face, she whispered into his ear, “What a coincidence. A thousand suns. That’s exactly how much I love you, Cowboy.” She rolled over onto her side away from Rulon and now the moon shadows spilled across her face. “But mine burn hotter,” she said into the night. 

 ———-

Jim

Zurich

 

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Can a thriller be humorous?

     Can a thriller be humorous? This question came up because of the trouble I have whenever I see a short description of A Thousand Suns. If the description doesn’t mention the humor, I’m bothered that they missed something unique about the book. If it does mention the humor, then I’m worried people wil think the book is funny, light, and not a real thriller. So, with this post, I’d like to set the record straight about humor in my thrillers.
     My books are not humorous, but they have characters who have a well-developed sense of humor and who tend to see the humorous side of most situations. For my characters, particularly Rulon, humor is a safety value and a way of dealing with unpleasant outcomes. In fact, this humor is part of what makes ‘A Thousand Suns’ a realistic book.
     In researching A Thousand Suns, I read the book On Combat by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman, a former army Ranger and West Point psychology professor. In it he talks about how men and women in life and death situations use humor to, in a sense, escape from reality.
     A Thousand Suns is a thriller. But it’s not a downer. It has a few laughs, thanks to my characters innate natures, but it also has scenes of courage, loyalty, love, hate, violence, disillusionment, and revenge. I don’t want readers to be crying at the end of it or laughing. I’d like them to put the book down when they are done and simply sigh, “Good story.”      On a different note: I have a new website design at: www.jimhaberkorn.com   I’ve also started using Facebook to publicize my upcoming book A Thousand Sunshttp://www.facebook.com/pages/A-Thousand-Suns/433298710075276?cropsuccess&success=1     Please free to visit those sites, and, if you feel so moved, let me know what you think. This blog post is also found on my website. I’ll be making a decision within a few days about whether to keep this blog or to simply transfer the activity to my website.

Best regards,

Jim – from Zurich

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A short description of ‘A Thousand Suns’

A Thousand Suns is a rip roaring thriller that takes place in Idaho and Zurich. And like Einstein’s Trunk, it is a little offbeat. The opening scene with Rulon, our hero, is a fight between him and a Russian spy in a Twin Falls cowboy Karaoke bar.  But it is Yohaba who is the main character in this one. In the course of being dragged deeper and deeper into Rulon’s world of spies, revenge, and violence, she learns new survival skills that will come in very handy in book three of the series – which I’m currently working on.

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A Thousand Suns

     In one of my previous posts, I mentioned that the sequel to Einstein’s Trunk was complete and titled World of Hurt. I thought the title was somewhat clever as it was a nice play on the hero’s last name as well as an accurate portrayal of what the book was about, i.e., Rulon Hurt’s somewhat painful world. Roughly 40% of the book takes place in the Twin Falls area of Idaho and the last 60% takes place in and around Zurich, Switzerland.
     But now I’ve changed the title to A Thousand Suns. The title comes from the expression ‘heat of a thousand suns’ – which Rulon uses to describe how much his enemies hate him and which Yohaba uses to describe how much she loves the big cowboy.  Can’t say more without giving away the plot, but I will add that Yohaba’s suns burn mighty bright, in fact, she dominates the book. The new title does a better job of capturing the human heart beating within the story – much more so than the old title. And besides, World of Hurt is a better fit for the third book in the series, which I’m starting on now.
     Speaking of Switzerland, I was having a conversation the other day on why some countries are more prosperous than others. Reasons were given. Opinions were shared. And then someone brought up Switzerland and mentioned that almost every negative condition raised could likewise be applied to that small country nestled in the center of Europe. Switzerland has limited natural resources, is landlocked, is split by multiple cultures and languages, has an expensive social safety net for its citizens, a lot of immigrants for its size, and is surrounded by countries with large militaries who have a history of going to war with each other. And yet it thrives. The longer I live in Switzerland, the more I appreciate its special place in the world. 
     My next post will cover a few tips I’ve learned on writing powerful descriptions.
 
Best regards,
 
Jim

Zurich

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